Extrovert eller introvert, vad finns mitt emellan

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Finding Out Whether You’re An Ambivert

It’s important to pin down where you fall in the introversion/extroversion scale. By increasing your awareness of your type, you can develop a better sense of your tendencies and play to your strengths.

If you think that you might be an ambivert, but aren’t certain, see how many of the following statements apply to you. If most of them apply, you’re most likely an ambivert.

  • I can perform tasks alone or in a group. I don’t have much preference either way.
  • Social settings don’t make me uncomfortable, but I tire of being around people too much.
  • Being the center of attention is fun for me, but I don’t like it to last.
  • Some people think I’m quiet, while others think I’m highly social.
  • I don’t always need to be moving, but too much down time leaves me feeling bored.
  • I can get lost in my own thoughts just as easily as I can lose myself in a conversation.
  • Small talk doesn’t make me uncomfortable, but it does get boring.
  • When it comes to trusting other people, sometimes I’m skeptical, and other times, I dive right in.
  • If I spend too much time alone, I get bored, yet too much time around other people leaves me feeling drained.

The trick to being an ambivert is knowing when to force yourself to lean toward one side of the spectrum when it isn’t happening naturally. Ambiverts with low self-awareness struggle with this. For example, at a networking event, a self-aware ambivert will lean toward the extroverted side of the scale, even when it has been a long day and he or she has had enough of people. Mismatching your approach to the situation can be frustrating, ineffective, and demoralizing for ambiverts.